Snap Judgments: TWSBI ECO

Bob at My Pen Needs Ink graciously loaned me his TWSBI ECO so I could try it out. The ECO is an entry-level demonstrator type pen, and since “ECO” ostensibly stands for “economical,” it’s perfectly aligned with my interests!

Aesthetics are in the eye of the beholder, but I think the white ECO looks very classy.

The cap has silver metal accents. TWSBI branding is etched into the cap ring, but I don’t find it obnoxious. At least they chose a nice, clean font.

The cap is hexagonally shaped, which I found useful as I don’t usually post my pens. It takes slightly more than one full turn to unscrew the cap. The clip is not springloaded, and it’s too stiff for easy use. I needed two hands to clip it to anything.

Perhaps my favorite thing about this pen is how the white cap and piston knob make inks inside the barrel pop with color. It’s a cool effect, especially with an ink like Iroshizuku Kon-Peki.

The red TWSBI logo on the end of the cap reminds me of a traditional signature seal.

I have smaller hands, and the unposted ECO is almost the perfect length for me. It’s a lighter pen in terms of weight, and I had no trouble writing for long periods with it.

The ECO was balanced in my hand when unposted, but posting the cap threw the weight distribution off in an unpleasant manner. Again, I have small hands so your experience may vary.

This pen has a steel nib that was smooth but offered some feedback. I’m used to Pilot’s silky-smooth nibs so the feedback was a nice change of pace. Since this was a loaner pen, I did not try to test the flex of the nib, but in regular writing it seemed on the stiffer side.

The flow was very good. This nib is more broad than I prefer given my handwriting, but it laid down a nice line and was enjoyable to write with.

I did not experience any hard starts or skips during my time with this pen.

Shaped sections are a point of contention, and the ECO’s section has a slight triangular shape, not as extreme as a LAMY Safari or a Pilot Kakuno, but there just the same. I use a traditional tripod grasp and I found the shape of the section to be unoffensive. The section’s diameter is on par with the Pilot Metropolitan and smaller than the Pilot Kakuno.

Certain TWSBI pens have a reputation for having issues with cracking, but this pen did not have any cracks that I could see. I believe this particular pen is a little over a year old at the time of this writing.

A fairly smooth writer with just the right amount of feedback. The broad nib is a little too wide for my liking. It lays down a nice wet line when using Iroshizuku Kon-Peki. The section has a bit of shape to it but I found it comfortable. This pen is really sharp looking by itself, but it’s a stunner filled with a beautiful ink like Kon-Peki. I thought I’d want an all-clear demonstrator, but the white cap and piston knob look great and compliment whatever ink is in the barrel. The TWSBI ECO is a lot of pen for the price, and I’m definitely adding one to my “to buy” list.

Many thanks to Bob for letting me borrow this pen!

Three Good Reviews of the TWSBI ECO:

The Metro and the Kid: Pilot’s sub-$15 Wonder Duo

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Fifteen dollars may not stretch as far as it once did, but it can get you a workhorse fountain pen that you’ll want to use every day, thanks to Pilot Corporation and its Metropolitan and Kakuno pens.

Many reviews have already been written about both these pens, so I’m not going to reinvent the wheel by reviewing them here. Instead, I’m going to discuss some features of interest in each pen, and point out some differences that might help you choose between them.

Pilot Metropolitan

The Pilot Metropolitan has an MSRP of $18.75 USD, but it’s easily found for less than $15. It’s a refillable pen that includes a Pilot-proprietary ink cartridge and a CON-20 squeeze-style converter that’ll allow you to use bottled ink right from the start.

The Metropolitan’s brass barrel adds some heft to a pen that’s not particularly imposing out of the box. It has plain, but classy, styling that would be suitable in a professional environment. The weight of the pen in the hand, plus its impeccable build quality, makes the Metropolitan feel like a far more expensive pen than it actually is.

But how does it write? Excellently, thanks to its fantastic nib. (It actually uses the same nib as the Kakuno, which makes choosing between these two pens mostly a matter of personal preference.) My Metropolitan wrote as smooth as silk from its first inking. The nib is stainless steel, with little to no flex, so don’t expect miracles in terms of being able to vary your line widths. If this is your first Pilot fountain pen, be aware that Japanese nibs tend to run thinner than their European and American counterparts. A Pilot fine nib creates a line approximating a 0.5mm gel pen, and a medium nib is close to 0.7mm.

The Metropolitan’s section (i.e. gripping area) is smooth, round plastic. It’s sized comfortably for smaller hands, but may not be large enough for folks with bigger fingers or those who prefer their grip higher up on a pen. The cap of the pen can be posted (i.e. slipped onto the end of the barrel) when writing.

Three Good Reviews of the Pilot Metropolitan:

Pilot Kakuno

The Pilot Kakuno has an MSRP of $13.50 USD, and that’s the price point you’ll usually find them offered at. It’s a refillable pen that comes with a Pilot-proprietary ink cartridge, but it does not include a converter. You’ll need to purchase a Pilot-compatible converter separately to use bottled ink.

The Kakuno is a plastic pen with a hexagonal shaped barrel. Due to its plastic construction, it feels light and less substantial in the hand. The flat sides of the Kakuno will keep it from rolling off a table, which is helpful because the cap does not have a clip. (Instead, the cap has a small nub to further prevent accidental roll-offs.) Pilot designed this pen for the children’s market, and the available colors and styling reflect “fun” more than “professional” — there’s even a smiley face on the nib.

As mentioned previously, the Kakuno’s nib is the same as the one found in the Metro, so both pens offer a similarly excellent writing experience.

The Kakuno’s section is plastic, and it’s molded into a somewhat triangular shape intended to guide you into a proper grip. Despite being designed with children in mind, the section is fatter than the one on the Metropolitan, and those with larger hands may find it more comfortable. The Kakuno’s cap can be securely posted on to the end of the barrel.

Three Good Reviews of the Pilot Kakuno:

In Summary

Choose the Metropolitan if…

  • you prefer a round grip section
  • you need a more professional looking pen
  • you prefer a pen that feels heavier in the hand
  • you’d like to use bottled ink immediately without buying a separate converter

Choose the Kakuno if…

  • you prefer a shaped grip section
  • you like fun, bright colors
  • you prefer a lighter pen
  • you don’t mind if the cap doesn’t have a clip