(Mis)Adventures in Pen Resurrection: Sheaffer Touchdown TM Craftsman

A couple of weeks ago I posted a picture from a pen I was working on. Those broken bits of o-ring kept me at my wit’s end for a solid hour, as I attempted to extract them from the barrel of the pen they belonged to, a Sheaffer Touchdown TM Craftsman.

The o-ring in question is part of the Sheaffer “Touchdown” filling system, which uses a sac to hold the ink and a sleeved plunger to create a vacuum to draw ink into the sac. Like Sheaffer vacuum-filler pens, Touchdown pens fill on the downstroke of the plunger, which is completely counter-intuitive. But it’s magical when it works, as this pen now does.

After disassembling the pen and giving it a thorough flush and cleaning, I found that not only did it need a new sac, it was also missing the protector sleeve that fits over the sac inside the barrel. It took a few weeks to find a replacement sac protector, and after that, installing a new sac wasn’t difficult. But that pesky o-ring at the end of the barrel… That thing had hardened into a fossil, and it took a variety of increasingly sharper implements to dig it out, all while trying to avoid damaging the threads for the blind cap inside the barrel.

It was so satisfying when all those o-ring pieces finally came out that I took a photo for posterity and shared it with you.

Want to know what else is satisfying? Dipping a pen that you fixed yourself into a bottle of ink, and watching it fill on the first downstroke. “Eeet’s alive!”

This particular pen was made in the 1950s. While the Touchdown TM Craftsman (“TD Craftsman” henceforth) was the budget model in the Touchdown TM line of pens, it still has classic lines and sharp gold trim.

The TD Craftsman is a smaller pen that’s light and balanced in my hand, posted or unposted. It’s a perfect fit for me, but I have small hands.

Size comparison, capped (L to R: Lamy Vista, Pilot Metropolitan, Sheaffer TD Craftsman, Pilot Elite, Pilot Long Murex)
Size comparison, unposted (L to R: Lamy Vista, Pilot Metropolitan, Sheaffer TD Craftsman, Pilot Elite, Pilot Long Murex)
Size comparison, posted (L to R: Lamy Vista, Pilot Metropolitan, Sheaffer TD Craftsman, Pilot Elite, Pilot Long Murex)

The #33 14k gold nib is classic Sheaffer: smooth and unpretentious. The tines have a bit of give to them, but no real flex. This might not be a “Lifetime” nib, but it throws down a wet line even with a dry ink like Pelikan 4001.

The top side of the tipping has an imperfection, but it’s perfect where it counts:

TD Craftsmans have a cap with a plain wire band. The cap on this particular pen is in fantastic shape.

Unfortunately, like most vintage pens, this one has seen some use (and some teeth). Seriously people, keep your pens away from your chompers! The imprint is intact, but on the thin side.

Overall, this is a good, solid pen that writes well. It’s worn but wears its bling proudly. It’s been places and seen some things. I’m not sure I’ll end up keeping it, but if I do decide to sell it, I hope it ends up with someone who will appreciate its performance despite its cosmetic flaws.

Sheaffer Touchdown Craftsman c. early 1950s

This pen needed a new sac and o-ring, and a new sac protector to replace the missing original.

The #33 open nib is 14k gold and lays down a smooth, wet line with a hint of feedback on TR (Tomoe River) paper. It is not flexible, but a nice, solid writer.

Aside from toothies on the blind cap, this pen is in decent shape, and the trim on the cap is in excellent condition with no brassing.

Pelikan 4001 Royal Blue

A Wild Pen Appeared: The Sheaffer School Pen V2

i-rzfqnjv-x2

I found my first wild pens today at a local flea market. One of the pens was a Parker 21, which I’ll write about later, but the other was a Sheaffer that I’d never seen before. (No surprise there—as a newbie, most pens are pens I’ve never seen before!)

As typical with wild pens, this one had been stored away inked, which had long since dried up inside the nib, feed, section, and cartridge. I took the pen apart and soaked the parts in some water mixed with a few drops of dishwashing soap. Blue ink bloomed in the water, full of promise.

In the meantime, I did some research and learned that this is a Sheaffer cartridge “school pen” V2, circa 1965. (Version 2 pens have conical ends on both the cap and barrel.)

After a nice long bath, I gave the Sheaffer a thorough cleaning using a bulb syringe until the water ran clear. I didn’t have any Sheaffer cartridges at hand so I cleaned the old one out and filled it with my favorite test ink, Pilot Blue Black.

Writing this with one of my very first wild pen finds! It’s a Sheaffer cartridge school pen circa 1965. The nib is not flexible at all, but it’s smooth and has just the right amount of feedback. Someone stored this pen away inked, which had dried all up in the section and feed. I gave it a good soak and cleaned it as best I could, and now it writes like this! Not bad for $4.

Here’s a closeup of the nib. I’m assuming it’s stainless steel.

The barrel also has some printing on it:

I’m the curious sort, so I typed that right into google and found a single hit: a 1964 yearbook from the University of Wyoming.

How this pen made its way from Laramie to the Mid-Willamette Valley, Oregon is left as an exercise for the reader.